Estrogen and the Transgender Woman

Testosterone and estrogen are the hormones associated with gender. The average male, female and everyone in between have bodies that run on and need both. Today we are going to explore estrogen and the effects of it on the transgender female. Please note before we proceed that if you are currently undergoing or thinking of undergoing hormone replacement therapy with estrogen that we strongly recommend you do so under the care of a physician. There can be many dangers and health risks if estrogen is not administered and monitored properly.
Hormone Replacement Therapy with estrogen is the process of administering the hormone to “male to female” transgender patients in order to induce and maintain the development of female secondary sex characteristics. Though estrogen cannot reverse the effects of puberty, HRT with estrogen can help develop female characteristics and make a patient look more like the female gender they identify with. It causes significant social and psychological changes while affecting your mood, energy, appearance and overall health. Though not a full cure it is very effective at treating patients with gender dysphoria. Estrogen can be administered by injections, pills, patches and subdermal pellet implants.
Both testosterone and estrogen are needed for healthy bone and to prevent osteoporosis. Estrogen is the predominant sex hormone that slows bone loss. The hips will rotate slightly forward due to changes in the tendons so hip discomfort is not uncommon. If estrogen therapy is conducted prior to the pelvis ossification that occurs around the age of 25, the pelvic outlet and inlet open slightly. This widening will also widen the femora as they are connected to the pelvis. The pelvis will still have some masculine characteristics by default but the end result will be wider hips than a normal male and closer to a cis female.