In-Womb Development of the Transsexual Brain


Nurture or Nature: What makes a Transsexual?
This is the big question that is faced by anyone who is or who knows a Transsexual. Because of a number of recent discoveries the balance has been tipped toward nature. There is now evidence that the “Gender Identity Dysphoria” (GOD) has it’s roots in prenatal biology (nature) and not in psychology (nurture).

Transsexual Brain Development
Like the normal male embryo, the male to female Transsexual brain starts out female. Then between the 8th and 24th weeks, the ‘XY’ chromosomes introduce testosterone hormonal changes, but the hormonal washes as faulty. They are either insufficient or ill timed. When this happens, the fetus develops a male body. However, some of the default (original) female brain processes remain intact. Thus, the brain’s gender identity remain intact. Thus, the brains gender identity remains female. This means that Transsexual males whose process of brain masculinization was incomplete, Their default female brains still function. The degree of arrested development can vary. The orgininal brain circuitry that was missed in the masculinizing process provides a continuing feminine influence. This explains why many Transsexuals, biological males know, from as early as 3 years old, that they are actually members of the opposite sex.
How does the FtM Transsexual brain develop?
Like the normal female embryo, the female to male Transsexual fetus starts out as a normal female. Then a problem occurs somewhere between the 8th and 24th week. Even though the ‘XX’ chromosomes have ordered no hormonal washes to take place, testosterone is still introduced. For example: An errant fetal adrenal glad causes testosterone to be produced in great quantities. The fetus is washed with testosterone, against chromosomal orders. The fetal body remains female. However, if the errant wash is strong enough, the female fetus brain is re-wired to think as male. This explains why many Transsexuals, biological males know, from as early as 3 years old, that they are actually members of the opposite sex.
What is the job of the ‘XX’ and ‘XY’ chromosomes?
It seems that one of the jobs of the ‘XX’ and ‘XY’ chromosomes is to govern the introduction of testosterone into the womb. However, chromosomal influence is limited by the many glitches that can happen during the fetal growth process. This is why each human being possesses a unique mixture of male and female traits. Some of these mixes (eg: Transsexualism) make the individuals who have them significantly different from society’s expectations. This causes these people much confusion and suffering. Indeed, there are, in our world, many males who have ‘XX’ chromosomes and many females who have ‘XY’ chromosomes.
Being Transsexual is not a choice
What can be known about Transsexuals?
Transsexualism does not rise from being exposed, in childhood to the clother, toys, activities, and goals of the opposite sex. Nor are Transsexuals; sex addicts, morally corrupt or mentally ill. Transsexuals are simply people who have the body of one sex and the brain wiring of the opposite sex.
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Brief Report – Body and Facial Hair Growth

Almost all transsexuals notice significant changes in their body and facial hair as a result of hormone therapy, but with a wide variation in results. Some may only notice a slight lessening of hair after two years, or (like the author) they may be fortunate and find entire regions of their body clear of hair. Therefore it is vital that as you read these reports, you understand that your results may not align with the results which are discussed.
TranswomenOne study with good management of the test subjects and controls examined the change in body hair and facial hair for transsexual women and men. There were 21 transwomen (all Caucasian, from age 20-44) who underwent an assessment of their body and facial hair density, growth rate, and diameter. All subjects were tested before starting hormone therapy, and at 4-month intervals up to one year from the start of hormones. All subjects were monitored on their cheek and upper abdomen. Over the 12-month period transwomen saw significant decreases in hair growth rates on their cheek and abdomen, with a mean reduction of 29% on their cheek and 50% on their upper abdomen. Hair density (hairs per square inch) decreased by 44% on their cheek and 50% on their upper abdomen. Hair diameter decreased by 20% on their cheek and 45% on their upper abdomen. Most of the changes were gradual over the 12-month period. (Giltay)TransmenIn the study by Giltay and Gooren there were 17 transmen (all white, from age 18-37) who underwent an assessment of their body and facial hair density, growth rate, and diameter. All subjects were tested before starting hormone therapy, and at 4-month intervals up to one year from the start of hormones. All subjects were monitored on their cheek and upper abdomen. Over the 12-month period transmen saw significant increases in hair growth rates on their cheek and abdomen. Here the results are somewhat skewed, as essentially no hair other than fine vellus hair existed on the cheeks and upper abdomen of the transmen prior to hormone therapy. Hair growth and density on the cheeks of transmen achieved the same levels as those of genetic males within 12 months, although the hair diameter was only 50% of that of a genetic male. Upper abdomen hair achieved a similar growth rate and density as that of genetic males, but hair diameter was about 40% of that of a genetic male. Hair growth rate rapidly accelerated in the first 4 months, but hair density and diameter increased more gradually over the 12-month period. (Giltay)
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